Blog

October 31, 2019

With a new minority federal government, you and I have an opportunity to help shape public policy. The Council of Canadians and our 150,000 supporters across the country are coming together from coast-to-coast-to-coast to stand up for the issues that matter to you.

One of those issues is water, specifically the water in your community.

Although most municipalities own and operate our drinking water and sewage treatment plants, the infrastructure is deteriorating due to chronic underfunding. This is where the federal government could step in with low-cost public funding for municipalities. Unfortunately, the government continues to side with corporate interests and is pushing public-private partnerships (P3s) that put our water at risk.

That’s where you come in. You can fight back against the privatization of our water at the federal level by letting government know that we are the balance of power. You can count on the Council of Canadians to fight P3s as the people’s balance of power. Let’s show the Trudeau minority government how strong we are, together.

October 30, 2019

On election day, the CBC published the news that Elections Canada received reports of misleading robocalls made to voters suggesting voting was taking place on Tuesday – the day after election day.

"There have been some reports of people receiving misleading robocalls in Quebec, Nova Scotia and New Brunswick," said Elections Canada spokesperson Nathalie de Montigny.

CBC News traced some of the calls to groups that are part of the Canada Strong and Proud network, a third-party group that opposes carbon taxes. New Brunswick Proud was also identified as a source of misleading phone calls.

October 28, 2019

The following is a transcript of climate and social justice campaigner Robin Tress's comments at the Law Amendments proceedings in Halifax, NS on October 28 2019. These comments are in response to Nova Scotia's tabled legislation that includes new greenhouse gas emissions targets

Robin speaking at Law Amendments for Bill 213, the Sustainable Development Goals Act, which includes legislated greenhouse gas targets for the province, are underway today. This is a screenshot of the livestream posted on nslegislature.ca

October 28, 2019

Private companies are coming for your water and the federal government is welcoming them with open arms. But you and I can stop this from happening. In this minority government, we can use our position as the people’s Balance of Power to stand up for water.

As you may know, the federal government, under both Liberal and Conservative leadership, has been aggressively promoting the privatization of our water and wastewater infrastructure and services for decades. These critical pieces to building healthy and equitable communities are being sold to the highest bidder.

Although most municipalities own and operate our drinking water and sewage treatment plants, the infrastructure is deteriorating as cities and towns face budget pressures and chronic underfunding. This is where the federal government could step in with low-cost public funding for municipalities. Instead, the government is welcoming the private sector to take over these public services by pushing public-private partnerships (P3s).

In 2017, the Trudeau government established the Canadian Infrastructure Bank, with a goal of involving private P3 partners in 80 per cent of their projects.

October 22, 2019

We are the balance of power

This morning I feel very determined about the road ahead.

Yesterday, Canadians went to the polls and elected a minority government. That means you and I have an opportunity to hold all parties to account and to assert the role of ordinary people in driving the change we want and know is needed.

Like you, I am deeply concerned about the climate and environmental crises, which are already affecting the lives of millions of people around the world. I worry on behalf of young people about the Earth they are inheriting. Canadians were clear. We want the government to act quickly and decisively to protect our living world and bring about a just transition for our economy – we have no time to waste in making our voices heard. These changes must right the wrongs endured by Indigenous peoples and include a just transition to sustainable jobs for working people.

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